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External Articles | Posted: August 14, 2005

Sordid Science: The Sex Research of Alfred C. Kinsey (The Catholic Standard & Times - Part 5 of 7)

CATHOLIC STANDARD & TIMES

Exclusive Series: Alfred C. Kinsey and American Sex Ed
Part 5 of 7
by Susan Brinkmann
CS&T Correspondent

When the fraudulent research of the acknowledged pederast, Alfred C. Kinsey, was allowed to influence American law, the fallout was devastating, and not only as far as soaring crime rates. It also caused a deep rending in the moral fiber of this nation.

Soaring Crime Rates

In her book, "Kinsey: Crimes and Consequences," Dr. Judith Reisman contains actual transcripts of testimony by Alfred Kinsey to the California Legislature where he uses his false data to argue for paroling rapists and even child sex offenders. Unfortunately, he was convincing enough to bring about devastating changes in the law.

For instance, Kinsey considered rape to be an "easily forgotten" crime by its victims. He is quoted in a book by Susan Brownmiller, "Against Our Will: Men, Women and Rape," as saying "the only difference between rape and a good time depends on whether the girls parents were awake when she finally came home."

Assuming Kinsey to be a real scientist, this kind of "data" about women and rape convinced the authors of the Model Penal Code that the justification for tough rape laws was largely moot. Therefore, the American Bar Association and the American Law Institute established new regulations for deciding if a girl was raped.

Reisman writes: "Where the victim is shown to have had a 'racy' past (not exactly defined by the Model Penal Code) for purposes of adjudication she might be labeled a 'prostitute.' Therefore, even when she was the victim of a 'gang' or fraternity 'group' rape, the guilty predator might be cleared of any crime."

The consequences of this loosening of the law against rape are not surprising. The nation is suffering from an epidemic of sexually violent crime, which Reisman lists as: "rape, gang-rape, date-rape, rape-mutilation, serial rape-murder, kidnapping-rape, rough sex rape-murder - victimizing the elderly as well as younger boys and girls."

Of the 324 homicides in New York in 1930, 1935 and 1940 (108 per year), only 17, or six per year, involved the rape of women or children. "FBI data for 1995 showing that New York experienced 4,654 murders in 1995, 3,333 were rape-murders," Reisman writes.

Another area particularly hard-hit by Kinsey's influence on American law is in the enormous increase in sex crimes committed against children. Spawned by his criminally obtained "data," Kinsey's so-called proof that children are sexual from birth produced the horrifying results listed in Reisman's book: "Current estimates of one in four females (and one in seven boys) have been molested by age 18 suggests that American children today are experiencing unprecedented rates of sexual abuse."

Kinsey believed his research supported the fact that children are harmed more by their hysterical parents than by whatever sexual contact they might have had. This lead to the loosening of laws regarding pedophilia as well as incest.

In a book authored by the Kinsey team entitled, "Sex Offenders," they write: "The horror with which our society views the adult who has sexual contact with young children is lessened when one examines the behavior of other mammals. Sexual activity between adults and immature animals is common and appears to be biologically normal." In other words, human behavior is supposed to be similar to that of animals.

It should come as no surprise then that by 1973 the American Psychiatric Association (APA) had removed pedophilia, as well as sadism and homosexuality, from its list of "disorders." They stated that the desires to do violence or to have sex with children becomes a disorder only if the pedophile feels guilty or has anxiety about his sexual desires or actions toward the children.

Reisman writes of the APA position on pedophilia and sadism: "The APA published 'study,' in line with the Kinseyan model, has reportedly already been used in the courtroom to erode legal protections that currently penalize child sex offenses - or, as some sexologists euphemistically term it, 'age-discrepant sexual intimacy.'"

These softening attitudes eventually lead to lighter sentencing and to the early release of convicted rapists and pedophiles back into society. Reisman writes: " . . . Only half of the convicted criminals receive prison sentences. Those who do receive time, serve about half of their sentence prior to parole. And of those paroled, half are recorded as recidivists (breaking parole, or committing new crimes when free)."

Perhaps the most dramatic example of the impact on our society of early parole for sex offenders is seen in a 1990 Tacoma, Washington case of a paroled child sex offender who raped and sexually mutilated a 7 year old boy. Prior to this atrocity, the offender had murdered a 15 year old girl and savagely molested seven other children. He was freed despite these crimes and the authorities knowledge of his plans to build a "death van" equipped with cages and shackles to be used in the capture and torture of young children. In spite of all this, the man lived next door to an elementary school.

Erosion of Marriage and Family
Another major area where Kinsey data negatively influenced the law and society was in the decriminalization of adultery, cohabitation and fornication, which lead to an overall weakening in the institution of marriage.

One page 208 of the Model Penal Code, Kinsey's data on adultery is cited as having found that "in an appreciable number of cases, an experiment in adultery tends to confirm rather than disrupt the marriage."

Reisman writes: "The argument was that legalizing fornication and adultery would have little negative affect on society since, according to Kinsey, fornication and adultery were already common among all socioeconomic groups. . . . Once believed, Kinsey's fornication and adultery data . . . contributed to the erosion of marriage . . ."

It was an erosion that would eventually bring about no-fault divorce. Originally intended to make it easier for women to escape bad marriages, casual divorce has resulted in making couples less willing to fully commit to their union which, in turn, reduces the likelihood of marital success.

Reisman cites the work of Bryce Christensen, who addressed some of the "appalling societal consequences from no-fault divorce" in "The Family in America" in January 2000: "The US Census Bureau reported that in 1950, 43 percent of children were at home with Mom while Dad worked full-time. By 1990, only 18 percent of American children had such a stable home . . . . Thomas B. Marvell calculated in 1989 that the adoption of no-fault statutes had driven up state divorce rates by some 20 to 25 percent. And in a 1999 analysis, a team of statisticians determined that in the 32 states which had enacted no-fault laws by 1974, these laws resulted in substantial number of divorces that would not have occurred otherwise . . . ."

Crime rates and the erosion of the family are only the tip of the iceberg when considering the havoc wreaked upon society by the sex research of a sado-masochistic pedophile. Teen pregnancies, soaring STD and HIV/AIDS rates, rampant cohabitation and single-parent homes are other areas that have been just as dramatically influenced by the widespread acceptance of Alfred Kinsey's research.

But no member of society has suffered more than our innocent children. Not only for the reasons stated above, but because Alfred Kinsey's distorted studies about women lead to one of the most disastrous Supreme Court decisions ever made - Roe v. Wade.

"The Model Penal Code was cited as a national authority on abortion three times in Justice Blackmun's written opinion in Roe v. Wade," Reisman writes. Blackmun cites page 147 of Draft 9 of the Model Penal Code where Dr. Mary Calderone of Planned Parenthood states that Kinsey's "scientific" data proved that "90 to 95 percent of pre-marital pregnancies are aborted."

Of course, we now know that Kinsey's data was collected mostly from among prostitutes and sexually unconventional women and then passed off as indicative of the general population.
This kind of sordid science doesn't come without a price - and more than 44 million Americans have already paid for it with their lives.

This series is based on the book by Dr. Judith Reisman, "Kinsey: Crimes and Consequences," available through her web site www.drjudithreisman.org [Judith Reisman]. You can help Dr. Reisman if you call 1 800 476-0975. She will send you a FREE copy of this important book for a TAX-DEDUCTIBLE GIFT of $30 or more. Donate more and get more books for friends and foes!